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Walmart, Target, Best Buy are closed Thanksgiving amid COVID-19, while CVS and Walgreens are open. See the list. – USA TODAY

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/shopping/2020/11/22/thanksgiving-store-hours-2020-walmart-closed-thursday/6338275002/

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For the last decade, Black Friday in-store sales have continued to creep into Thanksgiving, eating into time people used to spend around the holiday table.

Not this year during the coronavirus pandemic.

Retailers that have kicked off Black Friday on Thanksgiving in 2019 and past years are keeping the doors closed this Thanksgiving, moving more of the hottest deals online.

Walmart was the first to announce in July that it wouldn’t open stores on Thanksgiving for the first time since the late 1980s and others including Target and Best Buy quickly followed saying it was a way to support and protect employees in a trying year.

Black Friday 2020 store hours:When Walmart, Target, Best Buy and others open their doors Friday amid COVID-19

Holiday deals to your inbox:  Reviewed sorts the good from the bad and sends recommendations right to your inbox

The holiday shopping season got off to an earlier start and sales are lasting longer as retailers look to spread demand and reduce crowds. Sales dubbed “Black Friday” started in early November but there are still many new rounds of sales this week.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention classified “shopping at crowded stores just before, on or after Thanksgiving” on a list of higher-risk activities to avoid and in guidance issued ahead of the fall holidays also suggested more online shopping. 

Stores closed on Thanksgiving 2020

Here are the major retailers staying closed on Thanksgiving Day:

Walmart stores are closed Thanksgiving.

Thanksgiving Day grocery store hours

Because of state laws, Maine, Massachusetts and Rhode Island stores will remain closed Thanksgiving. Stores in some areas could also have varied hours because of local or state restrictions amid the pandemic.

Acme Market: Most stores open 7 a.m. to 4 p.m., all pharmacies closed.

Albertsons: Hours vary, but most have shorter hours..

Bashas’ Supermarkets: Open until 3 p.m.

Dillons Open until 4 p.m. 

Food Lion: Open until 4 p.m. 

Fred Meyer: Open until 3 p.m.

The Fresh Market: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Fresh Thyme7 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The Giant Company: Open until 3 p.m.

Giant Food: Open until 3 p.m.

Giant Eagle Supermarkets: Open until 3 p.m.

Harris Teeter: All stores close 2 p.m.

H-E-B6 a.m. to noon

Hy-Vee: Normal hours.

King SoopersStores open until 4 p.m., pharmacies closed.

Kroger: All stores open until 5 p.m., pharmacies closed.

Meijer: Supercenters open 6 a.m. to 4 p.m., pharmacies open 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., according to this news release.

Ralphs: Most stores open until 10 p.m.

Safeway: Varies, but shortened hours.

Smart & Final6 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Sprouts Farmers Market: 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Stop & Shop: Connecticut, New Jersey and New York stores open 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. while Massachusetts and Rhode Island stores are closed.

Tops: Open until 4 p.m.

Wegmans: Most locations open until 4 p.m. but Massachusetts stores will be closed.

Whole Foods Market: Varies. Many stores open 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

WinCo Foods: Stores close by 3 p.m.

Walmart Black Friday 2020 update:Here’s when PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X consoles go on sale Wednesday

Amazon Black Friday:Surprise! Amazon’s Black Friday 2020 sale is here with tons of amazing deals

Other stores open Thanksgiving 2020

Many stores are still operating with reduced hours due to COVID-19 and others will reduce hours further Thursday. Many gas station convenience stores will be open normal hours. Check with your store before heading out. Click on store names to search for location-specific information.

7-Eleven

Bass Pro Shops8 a.m. to 6 p.m..

Belk: Open for curbside and in-store pickup from 4 to 11 p.m.; reopen 7 a.m. Black Friday.

Big Lots: 7 a.m. to 1 p.m.; reopen 6 a.m. Black Friday

Cabela’s8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; reopen 5 a.m. Black Friday.

Circle K

Cumberland Farms

CVS: Most locations open regular hours but most pharmacies will be closed.

Dollar General: 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., excludes Maine, Massachusetts and Rhode Island.

Edible: 8 a.m. to noon.

Instacart: The on-demand delivery service will be “servicing orders nationally, with delivery in as fast as an hour, from as early as 6 am – 2 pm local time on Thanksgiving Day,” the company told USA TODAY.

Love’s Travel Stops

Pilot Flying J

Rite AidMost locations open regular hours but most pharmacies will be closed.

Sheetz

Walgreens: Most locations open regular hours but most pharmacies will be closed.

Wawa

More stores: Smaller chains and local stores may also be open on Thanksgiving. Some will post special hours on social media.

This roundup will be updated with additional store hours and retailers closed. Check back. And retailers with 50 or more locations, submit Thanksgiving store hours or say whether your stores are closed via this form.

Contributing: David P. Willis, Asbury Park Press

Follow USA TODAY reporter Kelly Tyko on Twitter: @KellyTyko

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PG&E rate hike aimed at improvements to ease fire risk – KCRA Sacramento

https://www.kcra.com/article/pgande-rate-hike-aimed-improvements-to-ease-fire-risk/34868014

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Pacific Gas & Electric’s household customers will be hit with an average rate increase of 8% to help the once-bankrupt utility pay for improvements designed to reduce the risks that its outdated equipment will ignite deadly wildfires in its Northern California service territory.The higher prices, approved Thursday, take effect March 1 and are expected to boost the bills of PG&E’s residential customers by an average of $13.44 a month. That may further strain the budgets of people struggling to make ends meet during a recession caused by the pandemic that is causing governments to curtail commerce and corral people at home in an effort to ease the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19.California power regulators approved the increase after two years of wrangling between PG&E and a variety of groups battling to limit how much of the financial burden customers should have to shoulder for the utility’s long-running neglect of a grid that supplies power to about 16 million people in a sprawling area.PG&E’s outdated equipment was blamed for causing a series of wildfires during 2017 and 2018 that killed more than 120 people and destroyed more than 27,000 homes and other buildings. The damage caused PG&E to file for bankruptcy in 2019, opening a legal avenue for the company to negotiate $25.5 billion in settlements with wildfire victims and others.The San Francisco utility emerged from bankruptcy five months ago and is now seeking to upgrade its equipment and adopt other safety measures to avoid facing financial calamity — and a public relations catastrophe — again.Under the agreement approved by California regulators, PG&E can’t use any of its additional revenue to pay for its bankruptcy settlements or enrich an executive team that has been overhauled in recent years.But PG&E does plan to use the extra money to help finance grid improvements, additional tree trimming around power lines and take other steps that the company believes will reduce the chances of sparking more fires. The utility is also making changes aimed at decreasing the scope of deliberate blackouts imposed during dry and windy weather conditions that raise wildfire risks in Northern California.“We want to work to exceed our customers’ expectations when it comes to safely and reliably delivering clean energy, reducing wildfire risk in an ever-changing climate, and building a safe and sustainable energy system,” said Robert Kenney, PG&E’s vice president of regulatory and external affairs.The Utility Reform Network, one of the groups that hammered out the rate increase settlement with PG&E late last year, had hoped California regulators would delay approval because of the financial strain stemming from the pandemic.“Hitting consumers with higher bills right now will only add to their problems,” said Mark Toney, TURN’s executive director.The sticker shock of the forthcoming PG&E rate increases has been magnified by the time it took to negotiate them while the utility was still in bankruptcy. Part of the 2021 increases cover the past year, too.Customers might have been even harder hit if not for the resistance to PG&E’s initial plan. The utility originally sought about $2 billion in additional revenue from customer rate increases from 2020 to 2022, according to regulatory documents. The final settlement approved by regulators will instead give PG&E an additional $1.15 billion instead.

Pacific Gas & Electric’s household customers will be hit with an average rate increase of 8% to help the once-bankrupt utility pay for improvements designed to reduce the risks that its outdated equipment will ignite deadly wildfires in its Northern California service territory.

The higher prices, approved Thursday, take effect March 1 and are expected to boost the bills of PG&E’s residential customers by an average of $13.44 a month. That may further strain the budgets of people struggling to make ends meet during a recession caused by the pandemic that is causing governments to curtail commerce and corral people at home in an effort to ease the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19.

California power regulators approved the increase after two years of wrangling between PG&E and a variety of groups battling to limit how much of the financial burden customers should have to shoulder for the utility’s long-running neglect of a grid that supplies power to about 16 million people in a sprawling area.

PG&E’s outdated equipment was blamed for causing a series of wildfires during 2017 and 2018 that killed more than 120 people and destroyed more than 27,000 homes and other buildings. The damage caused PG&E to file for bankruptcy in 2019, opening a legal avenue for the company to negotiate $25.5 billion in settlements with wildfire victims and others.

The San Francisco utility emerged from bankruptcy five months ago and is now seeking to upgrade its equipment and adopt other safety measures to avoid facing financial calamity — and a public relations catastrophe — again.

Under the agreement approved by California regulators, PG&E can’t use any of its additional revenue to pay for its bankruptcy settlements or enrich an executive team that has been overhauled in recent years.

But PG&E does plan to use the extra money to help finance grid improvements, additional tree trimming around power lines and take other steps that the company believes will reduce the chances of sparking more fires. The utility is also making changes aimed at decreasing the scope of deliberate blackouts imposed during dry and windy weather conditions that raise wildfire risks in Northern California.

“We want to work to exceed our customers’ expectations when it comes to safely and reliably delivering clean energy, reducing wildfire risk in an ever-changing climate, and building a safe and sustainable energy system,” said Robert Kenney, PG&E’s vice president of regulatory and external affairs.

The Utility Reform Network, one of the groups that hammered out the rate increase settlement with PG&E late last year, had hoped California regulators would delay approval because of the financial strain stemming from the pandemic.

“Hitting consumers with higher bills right now will only add to their problems,” said Mark Toney, TURN’s executive director.

The sticker shock of the forthcoming PG&E rate increases has been magnified by the time it took to negotiate them while the utility was still in bankruptcy. Part of the 2021 increases cover the past year, too.

Customers might have been even harder hit if not for the resistance to PG&E’s initial plan. The utility originally sought about $2 billion in additional revenue from customer rate increases from 2020 to 2022, according to regulatory documents. The final settlement approved by regulators will instead give PG&E an additional $1.15 billion instead.

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PG&E rate hike aimed at improvements to ease fire risk – KCRA Sacramento

https://www.kcra.com/article/pgande-rate-hike-aimed-improvements-to-ease-fire-risk/34868014

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Pacific Gas & Electric’s household customers will be hit with an average rate increase of 8% to help the once-bankrupt utility pay for improvements designed to reduce the risks that its outdated equipment will ignite deadly wildfires in its Northern California service territory.The higher prices, approved Thursday, take effect March 1 and are expected to boost the bills of PG&E’s residential customers by an average of $13.44 a month. That may further strain the budgets of people struggling to make ends meet during a recession caused by the pandemic that is causing governments to curtail commerce and corral people at home in an effort to ease the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19.California power regulators approved the increase after two years of wrangling between PG&E and a variety of groups battling to limit how much of the financial burden customers should have to shoulder for the utility’s long-running neglect of a grid that supplies power to about 16 million people in a sprawling area.PG&E’s outdated equipment was blamed for causing a series of wildfires during 2017 and 2018 that killed more than 120 people and destroyed more than 27,000 homes and other buildings. The damage caused PG&E to file for bankruptcy in 2019, opening a legal avenue for the company to negotiate $25.5 billion in settlements with wildfire victims and others.The San Francisco utility emerged from bankruptcy five months ago and is now seeking to upgrade its equipment and adopt other safety measures to avoid facing financial calamity — and a public relations catastrophe — again.Under the agreement approved by California regulators, PG&E can’t use any of its additional revenue to pay for its bankruptcy settlements or enrich an executive team that has been overhauled in recent years.But PG&E does plan to use the extra money to help finance grid improvements, additional tree trimming around power lines and take other steps that the company believes will reduce the chances of sparking more fires. The utility is also making changes aimed at decreasing the scope of deliberate blackouts imposed during dry and windy weather conditions that raise wildfire risks in Northern California.“We want to work to exceed our customers’ expectations when it comes to safely and reliably delivering clean energy, reducing wildfire risk in an ever-changing climate, and building a safe and sustainable energy system,” said Robert Kenney, PG&E’s vice president of regulatory and external affairs.The Utility Reform Network, one of the groups that hammered out the rate increase settlement with PG&E late last year, had hoped California regulators would delay approval because of the financial strain stemming from the pandemic.“Hitting consumers with higher bills right now will only add to their problems,” said Mark Toney, TURN’s executive director.The sticker shock of the forthcoming PG&E rate increases has been magnified by the time it took to negotiate them while the utility was still in bankruptcy. Part of the 2021 increases cover the past year, too.Customers might have been even harder hit if not for the resistance to PG&E’s initial plan. The utility originally sought about $2 billion in additional revenue from customer rate increases from 2020 to 2022, according to regulatory documents. The final settlement approved by regulators will instead give PG&E an additional $1.15 billion instead.

Pacific Gas & Electric’s household customers will be hit with an average rate increase of 8% to help the once-bankrupt utility pay for improvements designed to reduce the risks that its outdated equipment will ignite deadly wildfires in its Northern California service territory.

The higher prices, approved Thursday, take effect March 1 and are expected to boost the bills of PG&E’s residential customers by an average of $13.44 a month. That may further strain the budgets of people struggling to make ends meet during a recession caused by the pandemic that is causing governments to curtail commerce and corral people at home in an effort to ease the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19.

California power regulators approved the increase after two years of wrangling between PG&E and a variety of groups battling to limit how much of the financial burden customers should have to shoulder for the utility’s long-running neglect of a grid that supplies power to about 16 million people in a sprawling area.

PG&E’s outdated equipment was blamed for causing a series of wildfires during 2017 and 2018 that killed more than 120 people and destroyed more than 27,000 homes and other buildings. The damage caused PG&E to file for bankruptcy in 2019, opening a legal avenue for the company to negotiate $25.5 billion in settlements with wildfire victims and others.

The San Francisco utility emerged from bankruptcy five months ago and is now seeking to upgrade its equipment and adopt other safety measures to avoid facing financial calamity — and a public relations catastrophe — again.

Under the agreement approved by California regulators, PG&E can’t use any of its additional revenue to pay for its bankruptcy settlements or enrich an executive team that has been overhauled in recent years.

But PG&E does plan to use the extra money to help finance grid improvements, additional tree trimming around power lines and take other steps that the company believes will reduce the chances of sparking more fires. The utility is also making changes aimed at decreasing the scope of deliberate blackouts imposed during dry and windy weather conditions that raise wildfire risks in Northern California.

“We want to work to exceed our customers’ expectations when it comes to safely and reliably delivering clean energy, reducing wildfire risk in an ever-changing climate, and building a safe and sustainable energy system,” said Robert Kenney, PG&E’s vice president of regulatory and external affairs.

The Utility Reform Network, one of the groups that hammered out the rate increase settlement with PG&E late last year, had hoped California regulators would delay approval because of the financial strain stemming from the pandemic.

“Hitting consumers with higher bills right now will only add to their problems,” said Mark Toney, TURN’s executive director.

The sticker shock of the forthcoming PG&E rate increases has been magnified by the time it took to negotiate them while the utility was still in bankruptcy. Part of the 2021 increases cover the past year, too.

Customers might have been even harder hit if not for the resistance to PG&E’s initial plan. The utility originally sought about $2 billion in additional revenue from customer rate increases from 2020 to 2022, according to regulatory documents. The final settlement approved by regulators will instead give PG&E an additional $1.15 billion instead.

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PG&E rate hike aimed at improvements to ease fire risk – KCRA Sacramento

https://www.kcra.com/article/pgande-rate-hike-aimed-improvements-to-ease-fire-risk/34868014

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Pacific Gas & Electric’s household customers will be hit with an average rate increase of 8% to help the once-bankrupt utility pay for improvements designed to reduce the risks that its outdated equipment will ignite deadly wildfires in its Northern California service territory.The higher prices, approved Thursday, take effect March 1 and are expected to boost the bills of PG&E’s residential customers by an average of $13.44 a month. That may further strain the budgets of people struggling to make ends meet during a recession caused by the pandemic that is causing governments to curtail commerce and corral people at home in an effort to ease the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19.California power regulators approved the increase after two years of wrangling between PG&E and a variety of groups battling to limit how much of the financial burden customers should have to shoulder for the utility’s long-running neglect of a grid that supplies power to about 16 million people in a sprawling area.PG&E’s outdated equipment was blamed for causing a series of wildfires during 2017 and 2018 that killed more than 120 people and destroyed more than 27,000 homes and other buildings. The damage caused PG&E to file for bankruptcy in 2019, opening a legal avenue for the company to negotiate $25.5 billion in settlements with wildfire victims and others.The San Francisco utility emerged from bankruptcy five months ago and is now seeking to upgrade its equipment and adopt other safety measures to avoid facing financial calamity — and a public relations catastrophe — again.Under the agreement approved by California regulators, PG&E can’t use any of its additional revenue to pay for its bankruptcy settlements or enrich an executive team that has been overhauled in recent years.But PG&E does plan to use the extra money to help finance grid improvements, additional tree trimming around power lines and take other steps that the company believes will reduce the chances of sparking more fires. The utility is also making changes aimed at decreasing the scope of deliberate blackouts imposed during dry and windy weather conditions that raise wildfire risks in Northern California.“We want to work to exceed our customers’ expectations when it comes to safely and reliably delivering clean energy, reducing wildfire risk in an ever-changing climate, and building a safe and sustainable energy system,” said Robert Kenney, PG&E’s vice president of regulatory and external affairs.The Utility Reform Network, one of the groups that hammered out the rate increase settlement with PG&E late last year, had hoped California regulators would delay approval because of the financial strain stemming from the pandemic.“Hitting consumers with higher bills right now will only add to their problems,” said Mark Toney, TURN’s executive director.The sticker shock of the forthcoming PG&E rate increases has been magnified by the time it took to negotiate them while the utility was still in bankruptcy. Part of the 2021 increases cover the past year, too.Customers might have been even harder hit if not for the resistance to PG&E’s initial plan. The utility originally sought about $2 billion in additional revenue from customer rate increases from 2020 to 2022, according to regulatory documents. The final settlement approved by regulators will instead give PG&E an additional $1.15 billion instead.

Pacific Gas & Electric’s household customers will be hit with an average rate increase of 8% to help the once-bankrupt utility pay for improvements designed to reduce the risks that its outdated equipment will ignite deadly wildfires in its Northern California service territory.

The higher prices, approved Thursday, take effect March 1 and are expected to boost the bills of PG&E’s residential customers by an average of $13.44 a month. That may further strain the budgets of people struggling to make ends meet during a recession caused by the pandemic that is causing governments to curtail commerce and corral people at home in an effort to ease the spread of the virus that causes COVID-19.

California power regulators approved the increase after two years of wrangling between PG&E and a variety of groups battling to limit how much of the financial burden customers should have to shoulder for the utility’s long-running neglect of a grid that supplies power to about 16 million people in a sprawling area.

PG&E’s outdated equipment was blamed for causing a series of wildfires during 2017 and 2018 that killed more than 120 people and destroyed more than 27,000 homes and other buildings. The damage caused PG&E to file for bankruptcy in 2019, opening a legal avenue for the company to negotiate $25.5 billion in settlements with wildfire victims and others.

The San Francisco utility emerged from bankruptcy five months ago and is now seeking to upgrade its equipment and adopt other safety measures to avoid facing financial calamity — and a public relations catastrophe — again.

Under the agreement approved by California regulators, PG&E can’t use any of its additional revenue to pay for its bankruptcy settlements or enrich an executive team that has been overhauled in recent years.

But PG&E does plan to use the extra money to help finance grid improvements, additional tree trimming around power lines and take other steps that the company believes will reduce the chances of sparking more fires. The utility is also making changes aimed at decreasing the scope of deliberate blackouts imposed during dry and windy weather conditions that raise wildfire risks in Northern California.

“We want to work to exceed our customers’ expectations when it comes to safely and reliably delivering clean energy, reducing wildfire risk in an ever-changing climate, and building a safe and sustainable energy system,” said Robert Kenney, PG&E’s vice president of regulatory and external affairs.

The Utility Reform Network, one of the groups that hammered out the rate increase settlement with PG&E late last year, had hoped California regulators would delay approval because of the financial strain stemming from the pandemic.

“Hitting consumers with higher bills right now will only add to their problems,” said Mark Toney, TURN’s executive director.

The sticker shock of the forthcoming PG&E rate increases has been magnified by the time it took to negotiate them while the utility was still in bankruptcy. Part of the 2021 increases cover the past year, too.

Customers might have been even harder hit if not for the resistance to PG&E’s initial plan. The utility originally sought about $2 billion in additional revenue from customer rate increases from 2020 to 2022, according to regulatory documents. The final settlement approved by regulators will instead give PG&E an additional $1.15 billion instead.

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